Legacy Products

Here you will find information on older rack-based and self-contained Bently Nevada monitoring systems that are no longer in production. The material is provided primarily to assist customers in identifying older products they may have installed, and in working with NVMS to upgrade to newer machinery protection systems. If you need assistance with transducers, software, portable instruments, and other non-current Bently Nevada products, or for monitoring systems not included here, please contact NVMS.

 

Directory

Picture Product Name Status Recommendation
3300 Series Monitoring System  Production: 1988 to 2010
Phase 5 obsolescence (no new systems or spares supplied, no repair available, not recommended for continued use) 3500 ENCORE Series Monitoring System. The 3300 System provided continuous, online monitoring suitable for machinery protection applications, and was designed to fully meet the requirements of the American Petroleum Institute’s API 670 standard for such systems. For the majority of applications, Bently Nevada recommends the use of our 3500 ENCORE Series Monitoring System as a state-of-the-art product with a variety of features and functions not available with 3300. 3500 ENCORE is the most cost-effective upgrade solution for the 3300 Series.
11000 Series Smart Monitor® System   Production: 1980 to 1986 Phase 5 obsolescence (no new systems or spares supplied, no repair available, not recommended for continued use) 3500 Series Machinery Protection SystemThe Smart Monitor® Series was fully digital – a very progressive system for its time. It was advertised as “more than a monitoring system” because it combined both the machinery protection functions of a traditional monitoring system and the “front end” signal conditioning for computerized condition monitoring into a single, integrated system. No external hardware was required between the Smart Monitor® rack and a host computer system. It was intended for critical machinery applications and featured display and other functionality consistent with API 670 requirements.
9000 Series Production: 1977 to 1993 Phase 5 obsolescence (no new systems or spares supplied, no repair available, not recommended for continued use) 3500 Series Machinery Protection SystemThe 9000 Series monitoring system was developed as a lower-cost alternative to our 7200 Series monitoring system for those customers who wanted permanent machinery protection capabilities, but did not require all the features provided in 7200.
7200 Series Production: 1975 to 1993 Phase 5 obsolescence (no new systems or spares supplied, no repair available, not recommended for continued use) 3500 Series Machinery Protection SystemThe 7200 Series monitoring system was our full-featured “flagship” monitoring system from 1975 until the introduction of the 3300 Series System in 1989.
7000 Series Production: 1972 to 1978 Phase 5 obsolescence (no new systems or spares supplied, no repair available, not recommended for continued use) 3500 Series Machinery Protection SystemThe 7000 Series monitoring system was developed as the first Bently Nevada platform for Turbine Supervisory Instrumentation (TSI) measurements common in the power generation industry on large steam turbine-generator machine trains.
5000 Series Production: 1967 to 1980 Phase 5 obsolescence (no new systems or spares supplied, no repair available, not recommended for continued use) 3500 Series Machinery Protection SystemThe 5000 Series monitoring system was the very first Bently Nevada standard monitoring system. Prior to that, all systems were essentially custom designed based on specific customer requirements.
2201 Series Production: 1992 to 2001 Phase 3 obsolescence (no new systems, spares supplied through 2005, repair available through 2009) 1701 FieldMonitor™ Machinery Protection System (3500 Series Machinery Protection System for Hydro applications)
1800 Series Production: 1993 to 2000 Phase 5 obsolescence (no new systems or spares supplied, no repair available, not recommended for continued use) 1701 FieldMonitor™ Machinery Protection System or 3500 Series Machinery Protection SystemThe 1800 Series was a family of 4-20 mA vibration transmitters, designed primarily to meet the machinery protection needs of a single, large customer. Not really a monitoring “system” in the strict sense of the word, the 1800 Series was really a collection of transducer modules that provided a 4-20 mA output proportional to the overall vibration amplitude. To function as a monitoring system, these outputs needed to be connected to a Programmable Electronic System (PES) such as a programmable logic controller, distributed control system, or machine control system.
1700 Series Production: 1973 to 1990 Phase 5 obsolescence (no new systems or spares supplied, no repair available, not recommended for continued use) 1701 FieldMonitor™ Machinery Protection System, 3500 Series Machinery Protection System, or 1900 Series Machinery Protection SystemThe 1700 Series monitoring system was aimed at smaller, less-critical machine trains that did not warrant a rack-based system. To reduce installation costs, the system was designed for mounting inside a standard electrical junction box, locally at the machine. It used built-in Proximitor® sensors, which required that the monitor be located within reach of a standard proximity probe extension cable (generally, 20 feet or less from the probe tip).
VAM® Velocity Alarm Monitoring System   Production: 1983 to 1988 Phase 5 obsolescence (no new systems or spares supplied, no repair available, not recommended for continued use) Trendmaster® 2000 SystemThe Velocity Alarm Module (VAM®) System was not really a monitoring system in the sense that it could be used for machinery protection. It consisted of a special battery-powered velocity transducer with internal peak detection circuitry and a single user-adjustable alarm setpoint. An alarm condition was annunciated via a red LED on top of the VAM device. An optional 8-channel receiver/annunciator module could be purchased which provided relay contacts; it used fiber optic cable to detect whether the alarm LED on the VAM sensor was illuminated, and could be located up to 100 meters (300 feet) from the individual VAM sensors. However, the relay contacts on the receiver/annunciator were not intended for use as a machinery auto-shutdown system. Instead, they were intended to drive other annunciator panels, such as in a plant control room